Increasing Depression in the setting of COVID-19

Increasing Depression in the setting of COVID-19

Coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19, is a viral disease that originated in China. Symptoms include fever, shortness of breath, body aches, and cough. The USA has passed 5600 deaths and has over 236,000 cases1, with the USA having the most reported cases in the world. Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading US infectious disease expert, has predicted the coronavirus can kill as many as 200,000 Americans.2

Ketamine for Mood Disorders

Ketamine for Mood Disorders

There has been a lot in the news regarding Ketamine and its use and potential benefits in a variety of mood disorders,- including major depressive disorders. This includes a 2017 article in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggesting Ketamine may be effective in treating suicidality, and subsequently hundreds of articles both in the lay press and medical press have emerged.

Not Just the Blues: The Truth About PTSD and Depression

Not Just the Blues: The Truth About PTSD and Depression

Your partner or friend has said they’re worried about you. Maybe you can’t stop reliving the traffic accident you were in a few months back. You’re struggling with mood swings and low self-esteem. Or you’re avoiding social situations, and spending more time on your own – concentrating solely on work, and spending all your free time watching Netflix. Does this sound familiar?

Ketamine and Other Viable Treatment Strategies for Depression

Ketamine and Other Viable Treatment Strategies for Depression

Depression, or Major Depressive disorder (MDD), is a common mental health disorder in the USA. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 7.1% of all US adults, or 17.3 million people, had an episode of depression in 2017. The prevalence of depression was higher among females and highest in individuals between 18-25 years old.